Posted on

Configuring Websphere MQ

configuring websphere mq message broker

Configure Websphere MQ Messaging Provider

The WebSphere MQ JMS provider maps to the WebSphere MQ messaging system which is one of the most widely used message-oriented-middleware (MOM) product in the industry. It has been available for many years and is widely used to integrate applications on disparate platforms. The key runtime artifact in WebSphere MQ is called a Queue Manager.

Since WebSphere MQ is not part of WebSphere Application Server, its Queue Managers run in separate processes and are separately administered through the WebSphere MQ Queue Manager.

In order to proceed with Websphere MQ configuration, you need to download a trial of it at: http://www-947.ibm.com/support/entry/portal/downloads/software/websphere/websphere_mq\

Create Websphere MQ basic objects

In order to connect to WebSphere MQ messaging provider we will show at first how to create some basic MQ objects. The following commands can be executed from the MQ_HOME/bin folder.

To create a new Queue Manager called MQQueueManager issue the following command:

crtmqm MQQueueManager

Now start the Queue Manager named MQQueueManager by typing the following command:

strmqm MQQueueManager

To stop the Queue Manager enter the following command:

endmqm MQQueueManager

In order to create a new Queue definition for the MQQueueManager, you need to use the runmqsc command which takes its input from stdin, thus you will enter your command interactively.

So, in order to create a Queue definition using MQ scripting, enter the following commands:

runmqsc MQQueueManager  define qlocal(SampleMQ)  end

Now create a listener for your Queue by entering the following commands:

runmqsc MQQueueManager  DEFINE LISTENER(MQQueueManager.listener) TRPTYPE (TCP) PORT(1424)  START LISTENER(MQQueueManager.listener)  end

Finally, restart the QueueManager for your commands to take effect:

endmqm MQQueueManager  strmqm MQQueueManager

Configuring a Connection Factory with WebSphere MQ

To configure a JMS connection factory for the WebSphere MQ provider, choose Resources> JMS> Connection factories. In the Connection factories window, select the Scope of your resource and then click “New”.

configuring websphere mq message broker 

In the next step select the WebSphere MQ messaging provider option,

configuring websphere mq message broker 

Click OK. This will take you to the Step 1 wizard where you need to enter the Name for the Connection Factory and the JNDI name that binds it to the name space.

configuring websphere mq message broker 

Click Next to continue. In the Step 2, you should determine how to connect to Websphere MQ. Choose “Enter all the required information into this wizard “option, as shown:

configuring websphere mq message broker 

Click Next to continue. In the Step 2.1 you need to supply the Queue Manager or Queue sharing group name you wish to connect to. (see the paragraph “Create Websphere MQ basic objects” )

configuring websphere mq message broker 

Click Next. In the Step 2.2 choose the transport type and specify the host and port of the MQ Queue Manager. The port must match the listener port that you defined for the Queue Manager.

configuring websphere mq message broker 

Click Next. You can check your connection by clicking on the Test connection to verify that you can connect to the WebSphere MQ Queue Manager. In the Summary window, review your configuration, then click Finish and Save.

Posted on

Configuring JMS endpoints with the default provider

configure jms destination websphere broker

Configuring JMS Destination on Websphere application server

You can configure both Queue and Topic destinations for the default messaging provider. Creating a JMS destination using the default messaging provider is a two process step which requires

  • Registering the JMS destination on the Bus
  • Definition of the JMS destination (and its binding) as WAS Resource

Let’s see each one in detail:

Registering the JMS destination on the Bus

In the first part, we will register a JMS Queue on the Bus by completing the following steps:

  1. Click Service integration > Buses.
  2. Then click on the JMSBus we have formerly created and navigate to Destinations link.

configure jms destination websphere broker

  1. From there, click New:

 configure jms destination websphere broker

  1. Now choose the destination type as shown by the following picture:

 configure jms destination websphere broker

  1. Next, enter an unique Identifier for the Queue destination, as shown in the picture:

 configure jms destination websphere broker

  1. In the last screen, you will assign the Queue to a Bus member. You can just leave the default values and confirm the queue creation in the last screen.

 configure jms destination websphere broker

Click OK and Save the changes to the master configuration. A new Queue name

DemoQueue has been created.

Definition of JMS destinations as WAS Resource

Once registered the JMS destination on the Bus, in order to be able to use it you need to define it as WAS Resource.

  1. From the Admin Console expand your Resources option and choose JMS > Queues.
  2. In the Queues window, choose the Scope for your destination and then click New.

 configure jms destination websphere broker

Select the Default messaging provider option and click OK:

configure jms destination websphere broker 

Complete the wizard by entering the JMS destination properties. In this example, we are binding the Demo Queue under the JNDI name “jms/demoQueue” and using the following properties:

configure jms destination websphere broker 

Click OK. The new Queue is created. Save the changes to the master configuration.

Posted on

Configuring a Connection Factory with Websphere default provider

configure jms connection factory websphere broker

We will now show how to configure a Queue Connection Factory using the default Websphere default JMS provider:

  1. Start by selecting Resources > JMS > Queue Connection factories.
  2. In the Queue Connection factories window, choose the scope, and then click New.

 configure jms connection factory websphere broker

In the next screen, you will need to associate the Connection Factory with a JMS Provider. Select “Default messaging provider

 

configure jms connection factory websphere broker 

Click OK to continue. Next you will enter the Connection Factory General Properties as shown here:

configure jms connection factory websphere broker 

The mandatory fields are the Connection Factory Name (which will be used as display name) and the JNDI name binding for the resources.

The actual list of Connection Factory properties is quite large and it’s beyond the scope of this book to discuss about them all. If you want to learn more, consult Websphere AS Messaging guide (http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/redbooks/pdfs/sg247770.pdf)

Click OK. The new connection factory is now created. Save the changes to the master configuration

Posted on

Configuring Websphere default JMS broker

websphere jms broker

This excerpt from the Enter­prise Appli­ca­tion Server Cook­Book that will teach how to configure the default JMS broker for Websphere application server.

If you want to fully understand the complex topics contained in this chapter we need to make sure that you have a basic knowledge of JMS core elements:

  • A Connection Factory is an object that a JMS client (a Java program that uses the JMS API) uses to create a connection with a JMS provider.
  • A JMS queue is a staging area that contains messages that have been sent and are waiting to be read (by only one consumer). Note that, in contrast to what the name “queue” suggests, messages don’t need to be delivered in the order sent. A JMS queue only warranties that each message is processed only once.
  • A JMS topic is a distribution mechanism for publishing messages that are delivered to multiple subscribers.

When using the default JMS provider your JMS Connection Factories will connect to a Service Integration Bus (SiBus), which hides the actual JMS implementation from the application. Applications then use queues within the SiBus to send and receive messages. At the same time, the JMS Topics are persisted in the SiBus and accessed through appropriate Connection Factories, which applications use to gain access to the Bus.

In order to create a JMS Connection Factory using the Default Provider you need at first create a Service Integration Bus which will act as a proxy between your messaging engines.

Connect to the Admin Console and choose Service Integration > Buses. Click on “New”. The new Bus wizard will start. In Step 1 enter the name of your Bus:

websphere jms broker 

If you have checked the Bus security option you will ensure that client applications authenticate to the bus and the authorization policy for the Bus is enforced. This will add some additional screen shots for specifying which security domain to use for securing your Bus. Please refer to the Chapter 11 for learning how to create a security domain).

Click on Next. In Step 2 you will be requested to confirm the creation of your Bus. Once confirmed, the Bus will be enlisted in the Bus summary page as shown by the following picture:

websphere default jms broker 

To complete the configuration of the SiBus, we must add an existing server as a member to the SiBus so that we have a facility for message persistence.

In order to do that, click on the “JMSBus” just created and, within the Topology section, click Bus members, as shown by the following screenshot:

websphere default jms broker 

You will now be presented with a screen where you can add Bus members.

By clicking Add and you will be able to select the server you wish to add as a member to the Bus. You will notice that the Server option is already pre-selected, as shown in the following screenshot:

websphere default jms broker

 

Click Next to proceed to the final screen, where you will choose the message persistence option between File store and Data store (the first one will persist your messages on a file system, the second one obviously on a database):

websphere default jms broker

The next screen will be dependent on your message store. Supposing that you have selected “File Store”, in the next step you will be able to configure the File Store properties:

websphere default jms broker

Click Next. In the following screen you will be able to tune performance parameters by choosing an appropriate JVM heap size; in the following screen we have just left the default values:

websphere default jms broker 

Clicking Next again will take you to the Summary page where you can review your configuration. Click Finish and Save to retain the changes.

You will now see the application server called server01 listed as a Bus member. At this point, the server must be restarted in order to activate the SiBus message engine. In the next recipes we can start configuring JMS resources on the top of it.

Posted on

Configuring the JBoss EAP module path

jboss eap tutorial jboss eap

JBoss EAP features a full modular architecture where you can easily plug-in and remove libraries in order to create a customized server distribution. By default, the application server modules are searched in the location specified by the environment variable JBOSS_MODULEPATH. This variable defaults to the JBOSS_HOME/modules folder; you can however specify a new or an additional path for your modules by setting this variable in your OS environment.

Example: (Linux users):

JBOSS_MODULESPATH=/usr/libs/custom-modules;$JBOSS_HOME/modules

 

You can alternatively boot the server using the -mp switch which by default uses the path specified by JBOSS_MODULESPATH variable.

Since there can be multiple paths available in the JBOSS_MODULESPATH subsystem, the following loading precedence applies:

/usr/libs/custom-modules

/modules

/modules/system/layers

/modules/system/add-ons/

The above behavior makes it relatively straightforward to define a common repository for your EAP installations: in the following example, there’s a shared module repository in /var/lib/modules and a corresponding symbolic link in each distribution pointing to the common repository:

jboss eap tutorial jboss eap

Posted on

Advanced JAX-WS Web Services

advanced jax-ws web services book

 

advanced jax-ws web services book

Published: September 2014

Author: Alessio Soldano

Pages: 145

 eBook (PDF) Price: 9.99 €


{quicksell file=”AdvancedJAX-WS-WebServices-ItBuzzPress(2014).pdf” price=”9.99″ title=”Advanced JAX-WS Web services” currency=”EUR” customPayPal=”” emailDelivery=”” requireRegistration=”” discount_rate=”” return_url=”” notification_email=”marchioni.francesco@gmail.com” rm=”” cbt=”” sub=”” addToCart=””}css_buttons/00001{/quicksell}

 

 

Credit Card Payments are performed using Skrill Payment gateway. Skrill is the easy way to make safe and fast online payments internationally, with the highest security standards. Learn more about Skrill here

{tab Description|blue}

In this book you’ll learn the concepts of SOAP based Web Services architecture and get practical advice on building and deploying Web Services in the enterprise. Starting from the basics and the best practices for setting up a development environment, this book enters into the inner details of the JAX-WS in a clear and concise way. You will also learn about the major toolkits available for creating, compiling and testing SOAP Web Services and how to address common issues such as debugging data and securing its content.

What you will learn from this book:

  • Move your first steps with SOAP Web Services. Installing the tools required for developing and testing applications.
  • Developing Web Services using top-down and bottom-up approach.
  • Using Maven archetypes to speed up Web Services creation.
  • Getting into the details of JAX-WS types: Java to XML mapping and XML to Java
  • Developing SOAP Web Services on WildFly 8 and Tomcat. Running native Apache CXF on WildFly
  • Securing Web Services. Applying authentication policies to your services. Encrypting the communication.

{tab Table of Contents|green}

Chapter 1: First steps with JAX-WS Web Services, discusses about what JAX-WS is and how to get started with developing services using it.

Chapter 2: Developing JAX-WS Web Service Applications, dives deep into Web Services development. In particular, you will get detailed information on how to create Web Service clients from a WSDL contract, how to create a full Web Service project using the WSDL-to-Java tools and top-down methodology. Finally, we will show another option for creating a full Web Service project using a Maven archetype specifically focused on WildFly

Chapter 3: Advanced JAX-WS and JAXB usage, covers some advanced concepts that are often required to deal with non trivial web services applications such as Oneway invocations, JAX-WS handlers, JavaEE injection and JAX-WS components, Asynchronous invocations, Fault handling

Chapter 4: WildFly JAX-WS Provider, provides information on how the JAX-WS specification is implemented in WildFly. While users can certainly rely on the vanilla WildFly configuration, a good grasp of the various layers building up the Web Services stack of the server allows better configuration and tuning.

Chapter 5: Web Services Security, introduces to the most common concerns about Web Services security. After an initial overview of the key security concepts some common scenarios will be described through source code examples and directions on configuring the WildFly container properly.

Appendix: Shows how to create top-down Web Services and Web Service clients using the Eclipse wizard. Detailed instructions on running tests are included.

{tab The Author|red}

The Author 
Alessio Soldano

Alessio has joined JBoss / Red Hat at the end of 2007. Since then, he’s been working full time on the webservice project, currently serving as its lead. He also contributes to WildFly and other JBoss projects. Starting from 2009, Alessio
represents Red Hat Middleware on JSR-224 ‘JavaTM API for XML-Based Web Services (JAX-WS) 2.0’ expert group. Alessio has also represented Red Hat at the W3C Web Services Resource Access Working Group. Finally, Alessio is committer and PMC member of the Apache CXF webservice project.

{tab Print Version|green}

The Print version is available on Lulu bookstore. (Price 19.99 €) 

Support independent publishing: Buy this book on Lulu.

{/tabs}

Posted on

WildFly Performance tuning (2)

Published: December 2018

Author: Francesco Marchioni

Pages: 140

eBook (PDF) Price: 9.99 €

{quicksell file=”ItBuzzPress-WildFlyPerformanceTuning.zip” price=”0.50″ title=”WildFly Performance Tuning” currency=”” customPayPal=”” emailDelivery=”on” requireRegistration=”” discount_rate=”” return_url=”” notification_email=”marchioni.francesco@gmail.com” rm=”” cbt=”” sub=”” addToCart=”on”}css_buttons/00001{/quicksell}

WildFly Performance Tuning (PDF + MOBI File included)

Print version now available!

Credit Card Payments are performed using Skrill Payment gateway. Skrill is the easy way to make safe and fast online payments internationally, with the highest security standards. Learn more about Skrill here

{tab Description|blue}

JBoss Application server is the most popular open-source Java application server, renamed as WildFly. This book covers all details about improving the performance of applications running on the top of it, covering details such as:

  • Get the most from the environment where WildFly is running
  • Monitor and optimize the JVM by analyzing its behavior
  • Learn various tools to monitor WildFly
  • Monitor and tune various subsystems included within WildFly
  • Know the pros and cons of application server settings
  • Discover low level details to tune a clustered WildFly environment
  • …and much more!

{tab Table of Contents|green}

Chapter 1: Introduces to the basic strategies for tuning, describing how data should be initially gathered, analyzed and verified
Chapter 2: Discusses the tools that can be used to monitor the performance of the application server,from the standard JMX toolings to ELK stacks and advanced Command Line functions
Chapter 3: Covers JVM tuning, guiding you to an optimal configuration of the Virtual Machine Environment and its Garbage Collection policies
Chapter 4: Tuning Data access: spanning from JDBC to JPA/Hibernate, it covers every best practice to improve the most common bottleneck of every application
Chapter 5: Discusses the best tactics to tune the EJB Container and the objects running in it.
Chapter 6: Contains guidelines to achieve the best performance for messaging applications and WildFly broker (ArtemisMQ)
Chapter 7: Tuning how data is logged and some common pitfalls to avoid
Chapter 8: Discusses some options to control Transaction storage tuning
Chapter 9: Contains best practices to tune the Web Server (Undertow) and the related io subsystem
Chapter 10: Discusses JGroups tuning, with plenty of discussion on the available tools to measure its performance
Chapter 11: Environment tuning is the last aspect discussed in the book, covering some best practices for File Descriptors, TCP-IP configuration and Storage

 

{tab Print Version|grey}
Soon Available on your local Amazon store!

 

 

{tab Book Updates|blue}

Current version of the eBook 1.0 ( Updated: December 2018)

No new updates available now.

{tab The Author|red}

The Author
Francesco Marchioni is QA Engineer employed at Red Hat. Over the past 10 years, he has started an IT portal focused on JBoss products (http://www.mastertheboss.com) and has authored the following titles:

{/tabs}

Book bundles – save 15%!

jboss wildfly performance tuning book

Price: 17,99 € for the two eBooks (PDF)

{quicksell file=”wildfly-bundle2.zip” price=”17.99″ title=”WildFly Tuning and WildFly Administration Book bundle” currency=”EUR” customPayPal=”” emailDelivery=”on” requireRegistration=”” discount_rate=”” return_url=”” notification_email=”marchioni.francesco@gmail.com” rm=”” cbt=”” sub=”” addToCart=”on”}css_buttons/00001{/quicksell}

jboss wildfly performance tuning book

Price: 17,99 € for the two eBooks (PDF)

{quicksell file=”wildfly-bundle3.zip” price=”17.99″ title=”WildFly Tuning and Practical JEE Development Book bundle” currency=”EUR” customPayPal=”” emailDelivery=”on” requireRegistration=”” discount_rate=”” return_url=”” notification_email=”marchioni.francesco@gmail.com” rm=”” cbt=”” sub=”” addToCart=”on”}css_buttons/00001{/quicksell}

Buy a book bundle and save 15% !

 

 

 

 

Posted on

WildFly Performance tuning

Published: December 2018

Author: Francesco Marchioni

Pages: 140

eBook (PDF) Price: 9.99 €

{quicksell file=”ItBuzzPress-WildFlyPerformanceTuning.zip” price=”9.99″ title=”WildFly Performance Tuning” currency=”” customPayPal=”” emailDelivery=”on” requireRegistration=”” discount_rate=”” return_url=”” notification_email=”marchioni.francesco@gmail.com” rm=”” cbt=”” sub=”” addToCart=”on”}css_buttons/00001{/quicksell}

WildFly Performance Tuning (PDF + MOBI File included)

Print version now available!

Credit Card Payments are performed using Skrill Payment gateway. Skrill is the easy way to make safe and fast online payments internationally, with the highest security standards. Learn more about Skrill here

{tab Description|blue}

JBoss Application server is the most popular open-source Java application server, renamed as WildFly. This book covers all details about improving the performance of applications running on the top of it, covering details such as:

  • Get the most from the environment where WildFly is running
  • Monitor and optimize the JVM by analyzing its behavior
  • Learn various tools to monitor WildFly
  • Monitor and tune various subsystems included within WildFly
  • Know the pros and cons of application server settings
  • Discover low level details to tune a clustered WildFly environment
  • …and much more!

{tab Table of Contents|green}

Chapter 1: Introduces to the basic strategies for tuning, describing how data should be initially gathered, analyzed and verified
Chapter 2: Discusses the tools that can be used to monitor the performance of the application server,from the standard JMX toolings to ELK stacks and advanced Command Line functions
Chapter 3: Covers JVM tuning, guiding you to an optimal configuration of the Virtual Machine Environment and its Garbage Collection policies
Chapter 4: Tuning Data access: spanning from JDBC to JPA/Hibernate, it covers every best practice to improve the most common bottleneck of every application
Chapter 5: Discusses the best tactics to tune the EJB Container and the objects running in it.
Chapter 6: Contains guidelines to achieve the best performance for messaging applications and WildFly broker (ArtemisMQ)
Chapter 7: Tuning how data is logged and some common pitfalls to avoid
Chapter 8: Discusses some options to control Transaction storage tuning
Chapter 9: Contains best practices to tune the Web Server (Undertow) and the related io subsystem
Chapter 10: Discusses JGroups tuning, with plenty of discussion on the available tools to measure its performance
Chapter 11: Environment tuning is the last aspect discussed in the book, covering some best practices for File Descriptors, TCP-IP configuration and Storage

 

{tab Print Version|grey}
Soon Available on your local Amazon store!

 

 

{tab Book Updates|blue}

Current version of the eBook 1.0 ( Updated: December 2018)

No new updates available now.

{tab The Author|red}

The Author
Francesco Marchioni is QA Engineer employed at Red Hat. Over the past 10 years, he has started an IT portal focused on JBoss products (http://www.mastertheboss.com) and has authored the following titles:

{/tabs}

Book bundles – save!

jboss wildfly performance tuning book

Price: 17,99 € for the two eBooks (PDF)

{quicksell file=”wildfly-bundle2.zip” price=”17.99″ title=”WildFly Tuning and WildFly Administration Book bundle” currency=”EUR” customPayPal=”” emailDelivery=”on” requireRegistration=”” discount_rate=”” return_url=”” notification_email=”marchioni.francesco@gmail.com” rm=”” cbt=”” sub=”” addToCart=”on”}css_buttons/00001{/quicksell}

jboss wildfly performance tuning book

Price: 17,99 € for the two eBooks (PDF)

{quicksell file=”wildfly-bundle3.zip” price=”17.99″ title=”WildFly Tuning and Practical JEE Development Book bundle” currency=”EUR” customPayPal=”” emailDelivery=”on” requireRegistration=”” discount_rate=”” return_url=”” notification_email=”marchioni.francesco@gmail.com” rm=”” cbt=”” sub=”” addToCart=”on”}css_buttons/00001{/quicksell}

Buy a book bundle and save !

 

 

 

 

Posted on

Practical Enterprise Application Development

JBoss Wildfly 8 book
JBoss Wildfly 8 book

Updated: June 2020

Author: Francesco Marchioni

Pages: 425

 eBook (PDF) Price: 9.99 €

{quicksell file=”ItBuzzPress-PracticalEnterpriseDevelopment.zip” price=”9.99″ title=”Practical Enterprise Application Development” currency=”” customPayPal=”” emailDelivery=”on” requireRegistration=”” discount_rate=”” return_url=”” notification_email=”marchioni.francesco@gmail.com” rm=”” cbt=”” sub=”” addToCart=”on”}css_buttons/00001{/quicksell}

 

Updated to WildFly 20 and Jakarta EE 8 !

The most complete and up-to-date book on Enterprise development, covering Jakarta EE 8 and the Microprofile API

Buy it here and get one year of free book updates!

{tab Description|blue}

A hands-on practical guide disclosing all areas of Enterprise development , covering details about Jakarta EE with lots of examples to be run on either the newest WildFly application server or on Thorntail environment. 

The first part of the book covers everything from the foundation components (EJB, Servlets, CDI, JPA) to the new technology stack defined in Java Enterprise Edition (now Jakarta EE 8), including the new Batch API, JSON-P Api, the Concurrency API,Web Sockets, the JMS 2.0 API, the core Web services stack (JAX-WS, JAX-RS). The testing area with Arquillian framework and the Security API is also fully covered in this part.

The second part of the book discusses how to integrate the Jakarta Enterprise API wiith the Microprofile specification, to provide essential services to develop robust microservices such as the Configuration API, the Health API, the Fault tolerance API, the OpenAPI and Tracing API, the Metrics API, JWT Authentication API and REST Client API.

Finally, the third part of the book covers how to build Microservices using Thorntail fractions for both Enterprise API and Microprofile API

What you will learn from this book:

  • Everything you need to know about Java EE, Jakarta EE 8 and MicroProfile API
  • How to set up your development environment to build Enterprise applications and Microservices on the top of WildFly or using Thorntail.
  • How to use Maven plugin to simplify your project scaffolding
  • Learning the foundation components that constitute the backbone of your applications: EJB, CDI 2.0, JPA, JAX-RS, JAX-WS
  • Learn how to build loosely coupled applications using the straightforward JMS 2.0 API
  • Learn how to test your applications with Arquillian in a managed environment, remote environment and even on the cloud!
  • Discover how to develop Concurrent and Compliant Java EE applications using the Concurrency API and how to define Batch Jobs using WildFly’s implementation of JSR
  • Secure all kind of applications (Web/EJB) with standard and custom login modules. How to encrypt the communication of EJB applications and Web applications.
  • How to enhance your Jakarta EE stack with Microprofile API to build robust Microservices
  • How to turn Jakarta EE applications into Thorntail Microservices

{tab Table of Contents|green}

Part I: Developing Jakarta EE applications on WildFly

Getting started with WildFly covers the installation of the server platform and introduces the Java EE 8 platform most significant changes. You will learn as well how to install the tools required for developing applications

Getting ready for development discusses the basic steps for configuring the foundation of your Maven projects using the available WildFly archetypes.

Programming Servlet is a first access to application development using the long-lived Servlet API. The chapter spans from the basics to the new Java EE 7 non-blocking I/O feature and Java EE 8 new Servlet Push.

Developing Enterprise Java Beans, is about developing applications using the available EJB types, thus including the basic Stateless and Stateful beans, and the other variants (EJB Timers and Singleton EJB).

Context Dependency Injection discusses about the CDI API starting from the basics and then diving into more advanced concepts like Interceptors, Decorators, Alternatives, Events and the new Transactional option.

Java Server Faces covers the Java Server Faces API with particular focus on building applications using Facelets, shaping navigation between JSF views and the new exciting features of Java Server Faces 2.2

Learning the Java Persistence API after a quick introduction to Java Persistence API, describes how to set up a proof of concept project, how to spice it up using JPA 2.1 new features. Finally, this chapter describes some advanced development strategies such as Caching data and Listeners.

Testing applications using Arquillian is a deep dive into the application server integration testing framework. You will learn how to test our application across several different contexts, including a managed environment, a remote environment and an OpenShift cloud-hosted environment.

Developing applications with WebSockets teaches you how to leverage a full client-server WebSockets application including advanced examples using Encoders/Decoders and Asynchronous communication.

Developing SOAP based Web services discusses about creating, deploying, and testing web services using the JBoss JAX-WS implementation (Apache CXF) and avanced features such as JAX-WS Handlers.

Developing RESTful Web services covers concrete examples of REST Web services including the new JAX-RS client API and some advanced topics such as Interceptors and Filters.

Developing applications with JMS introduces the basics of the messaging service, showing off how to use the new JMS 2.0 API to code producers and consumers and how to create remote WildFly JMS clients.

JSON Processing discusses, after a quick introduction to JSON Structure, some practical aspects of JSON such as creating and parsing JSON models using the Object Model API and the JSON Streaming API.

Batch Processing covers Batch jobs and its specification language as specified by JSR-352. In this chapter, you will learn the two core components of batch jobs: Chunks and Batchlets and some advanced concepts such as Flows and Decision flows.

Java EE Concurrency introduces the Java EE Concurrency API (JSR 236) which outlines a standard way for executing more tasks in parallel on a Java EE Container using a set of Managed resources.

Securing WildFly applications gets you quickly to know WildFly security subsystem, showing how to set up login modules to Web applications and EJB applications and how to use the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) to encrypt their communication.

Part II: Extending Jakarta EE with the Microprofile API

The second part of the book shows how to develop robust and resilient Microservices on WildFly using the following Microprofile extensions:

  • Configuration: to develop portable configurations for your services

  • Health: to receive health checks about the status of the application server

  • OpenAPI: this API can be used to document your REST endpoint using annotations or a pre-generated JSON in a standard way.

  • OpenTracing: which defines behaviors and an API for accessing an OpenTracing-compliant Tracer object within your JAX-RS application

  • Metrics: to provide an unified way to export application metrics

  • Fault Tolerance: to leverage resilience in your services

  • JWT Authentication: to allow systems to authenticate, authorize and verify identities based on a security token.

Part III: Building lean Microservices using Thorntail

The third part of the book will teach you how to create Microservices using the so-called “just enough” application servers to support each component of your system. Includes:

  • Getting started with Thorntail
  • Coding Enterprise applications as Microservices
  • Securing and Harnessing your Microservices
  • Leveraging the Microprofile API with Thorntail fractions

{tab The Author|red}

The Author 
Francesco Marchioni is an OpenGroup and Sun Certified Enterprise Architect employed for an Italian company based in Rome. Over the past 5 years, he has started an IT portal focused on JBoss products (http://www.mastertheboss.com) and has authored the following titles:

{tab Print Version|green}
You can buy the Print Version of the eBook on Amazon

{tab Book Updates|blue}

Current version of the eBook 1.8 ( Updated: June 2020)

Claim your book update from here!

 

{/tabs}

Special Offer !

Price: 17,99 € for two eBooks (PDF)

{quicksell file=”wildfly-bundle.zip” price=”17.99″ title=”WildFly book bundle (2 eBooks)” currency=”EUR” customPayPal=”” emailDelivery=”on” requireRegistration=”” discount_rate=”” return_url=”” notification_email=”marchioni.francesco@gmail.com” rm=”” cbt=”” sub=”” addToCart=”on”}css_buttons/00001{/quicksell}

Buy both books and save !